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Ian Lind • Online daily from Kaaawa, Hawaii

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Food to fill the time until the first primary election returns

September 18th, 2010 · 1 Comment · Food

Tick, tock…the clock is ticking very slowly towards the first primary results, which are expected to be released in a couple of hours. So I’m killing time. I’ve got a camera out to get some afternoon cat pics, and I’m ten chapters in to the copy of Ross Thomas’ classic “Briarpatch” standing by.

And, being late in the afternoon, thoughts of food are flitting through my mind.

Aha. How about those food photos taken but not used?

Omelet in panThere was the Sunday morning omelet from a week or so ago. It’s made mostly with egg whites. I usually separate the eggs and use one egg yolk along with 5-6 egg whites.

I used to favor a small, Calphalon nonstick for omelets. In fact, I assumed that omelets would stick to my trusty old cast iron frying pans, and insisted on that Calphalon everyday pan. I actually liked cooking with that nonstick pan. It was easy cooking and easy to clean.

It it came with a “lifetime” warranty. The problem is that the pan’s “lifetime” turned out to be something around nine months of everyday use.

The manufacturer was pretty good at honoring its warranty and providing a replacement pan every time the surface started dying. But after the third or fourth time through the cycle, I realized the whole “lifetime warranty” thing was advertising hype and gave up on it.

Lo and behold, I quickly discovered that the cast iron actually produces a superior omelet, and I have a hard time understanding why I ever got drawn into the Calphalon detour in the first place.

Soup on stoveThen there’s the turkey soup.

It was more than two weeks ago that I pulled the turkey out of the freezer. It’s been there since the post-Thanksgiving sales. I think this 15-pound bird cost $5.99. That’s 40 cents per pound. Soup bones and fish scraps cost way more than this. But with another Thanksgiving coming soon, it was time to clear the space in the freezer.

So the bird sat in the refrigerator for most of a week thawing before going into the oven on Labor Day. For nine of the next 11 days, that turkey provided dinners and most lunches. The other two days we ate out.

We had straight turkey with gravy, potatoes or rice, stuffing, etc. for much of a week. Towards the end of the week, I stripped remaining meat off the bones, and the bones went into a big pot along with some onion, celery, thyme, and garlic. After the pot simmered for most of the day, I fished the bones out, skimmed off some fat, then added vegetables for the final push…carrots, potatoes, and celery, along with some chopped hot peppers (they go in most everything).

That pot of soup provided four dinners, if I’m not mistaken. Soup, salad, a little bread on the side.

The soup was wonderful. Incredibly economical. And when it was gone, we were definitely ready to move on.

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