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Impressions of Auckland

November 30th, 2012 · 2 Comments

Random images of Auckland.

“Because of women and land, men die.”

Maori proverb, included in an exhibit at the War Memorial Museum on the terrible land wars of 19th century New Zealand.

War Memorial Museum

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Graffiti along Anzac Avenue, Auckland.

Normalcy

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Poster in the window of the Auckland University Press office, Anzac Avenue, Auckland.

poetry

From Amazon.com:

Albert Wendt is an emeritus professor of English at the University of Auckland. He has been an influential figure in the developments that have shaped Pacific literature since the 1970s and was made Companion of the Order of New Zealand in 2001 for his services to literature. He is the author of Sons for the Return Home, Pouliuli, and The Adventures of Vela, winner fo the 2010 Commonwealth Writers Prize.

Wendt was a visiting professor at the University of Hawaii in 1999.

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Nice use of technology in a downtown municipal parking lot. I noticed the colored lights along the rows of parking stalls, but it took me a minute to figure out that the red lights were over occupied stalls, while the blue light signaled an open and available parking spot. In this case, it was a handicapped stall. I’m wondering whether regular open stalls had a green light.

This allowed a driver to quickly survey a row and see whether there was anything open.

Simple and very useful.

Open spot

Tags: General

2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Kimo // Nov 30, 2012 at 2:31 pm

    Have seen the ‘lighted’ parking stalls in use several places on the mainland. Great convenience . . . And, yes, green (usuaully) indicates an open regular stall.

  • 2 How about them Mets? // Dec 2, 2012 at 11:59 am

    “Because of women and land, men die.”

    It’s phrased in the passive tense, portraying men as victims. It could have been phrased “Men die for the sake of women and land.” This alternate phrasing renders men active participants in their own self-destruction, but with the connotation of male foolishness, altering the tone from tragic to comic. Perhaps it’s more flattering to the male ego, at least in this case, to be the passive tragic victim rather than the active but farcical protagonist.

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